The Australian song "Waltzing Matilda" as presented by the Boys Choir of MacArthur High School of Irving, Texas in 1974. Waltzing Matilda, Waltzing Matilda We tried it and thought it went well, so he then wrote the other verses." Up rose the troopers—one, two, a and three. 1 0. "You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me." [10][11], The march was based on the music the Scottish composer James Barr composed in 1818 for Robert Tannahill's 1806 poem "Thou Bonnie Wood of Craigielee". Waltzing Matilda was written by Banjo Paterson whose birthday is this month ... Matilda: A blanket to keep warm at night. [42], On 14 April 1981, on Space Shuttle Columbia's first mission, country singer Slim Dusty's rendition was broadcast to Earth.[43][44]. "You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me." Extensive folklore surrounds the song and the process of its creation, to the extent that it has its own museum, the Waltzing Matilda Centre in Winton, in the Queensland outback, where Paterson wrote the lyrics. The title is Australian slang for travelling by foot with one's belongings in a "Matilda" slung over one's back. "You'll come a-Waltzing Matilda, with me". waltz (or walk) Matilda carry a bundle of your personal possessions as you travel the roads. It featured lyrics rewritten with reference to the split in the, This page was last edited on 21 January 2021, at 01:49. Up jumped the swagman and grabbed him with glee The song was one of four included in a national plebiscite to choose Australia's national song held on 21 May 1977 by the Fraser Government to determine which song was preferred as Australia's national anthem. Matilda the Kangaroo was the mascot at the 1982 Commonwealth Games held in Brisbane, Queensland. Some oral stories collected during the twentieth century claimed that Paterson had merely modified a pre-existing bush song, but there is no evidence for this. (Chorus) Up sprang the swagman and jumped in the waterhole, And he sang as he looked at the old billy boiling, (London 1798) or "The Penniless Traveller" (O'Neill's 1850 collection). (Chorus) The situation turned violent with the striking shearers firing their rifles and pistols in the air and setting fire to the woolshed at Dagworth, killing dozens of sheep. "Whose is that jumbuck[N 2] you've got in your tucker bag? [47], There was an animated short made in 1958 for Australian television. "Oh, You'll come a-Waltzing Matilda, with me. In 1995, it was reported that at least 500 artists in Australia and overseas had released recordings of "Waltzing Matilda", and according to Peter Burgis of the National Film and Sound Archive, it is "one of the most recorded songs in the world". "Matilda, n.", http://www.nla.gov.au/epubs/waltzingmatilda/3-versions_of_WaltzingMatilda.doc, http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/WM/WMText.html, "Waltzing Matilda, courtesy of a tea-leaf near you", https://simple.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Waltzing_Matilda&oldid=7242661, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License. Under the shade of a coolibah tree, It has been widely accepted[13] that "Waltzing Matilda" is probably based on the following story: In Queensland in 1891 the Great Shearers' Strike brought the colony close to civil war and was broken only after the Premier of Queensland, Samuel Griffith, called in the military. You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me." Who'll come a'waltzing Matilda with me? Who'll come a waltzing Matilda, my darling, Waltzing Matilda, Waltzing Matilda You’ll come a-Waltzing Matilda with me Who’s the jolly jumbuck you’ve got in your tucker-bag? "You'll come a-Waltzing Matilda, with me". When Banjo Paterson wrote the song, he dropped the word "the" from the … [German Walzer, from walzen, to turn about, from Middle High German, to roll, from Old High German walzan; see wel- in Indo-European roots. The same report asserts, "Writer Matthew Richardson says the song was most likely written as a carefully worded political allegory to record and comment on the events of the shearers' strike. Up jumped the swagman and grabbed him in glee, And he sang as he watched and waited 'til his billy boiled There are various legends that explain how the swag came to be named "Matilda." “Waltzing Matilda” BY AWAKE!CORRESPONDENT IN AUSTRALIA. Trivia tidbit: The Matilda in the Australian song 'Waltzing Matilda' refers not to a person but to the knapsacks that swing, or waltz, on the backs of itinerant laborers as they walk along. Waltzing Matilda and leading a water bag, "You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me." The title of the song Waltzing Matilda is derived from the phrase 'waltzing the matilda' which means to travel from place to place in search of work with all your belongings, wrapped in a blanket, slung across your back. [10], Paterson sold the rights to "Waltzing Matilda" and "some other pieces" to Angus & Robertson for five Australian pounds. To ‘waltz Matilda’ is to travel with a … Who'll be a soldier for Marlboro and me? Through the crowded streets of Rochester, AUSTRALIA’S song “Waltzing Matilda” is widely known around the world. Waltzing Matilda, Waltzing Matilda And his ghost may be heard as it sings in the billabong The Australian poet Banjo Paterson wrote the words to "Waltzing Matilda" in August 1895[7] while staying at Dagworth Station, a sheep and cattle station near Winton in Central West Queensland owned by the Macpherson family. Who'll come a waltzing Matilda with me? Up jumped the swagman and grabbed him with glee, Under the shade of a coolibah tree, The music, based on a folk song, was written by Christina Macpherson. The performers were Jason Barry-Smith as Banjo Paterson, Guy Booth as Dawson, David Kidd as Smith, Emily Burke as Melba, Zoe Traylor as Moncrieff, and Donna Balson (piano, voice). [10] The first verse of "The Bold Fusilier" is: A bold fusilier came marching back through RochesterOff from the wars in the north country,And he sang as he marchedThrough the crowded streets of Rochester,Who'll be a soldier for Marlboro and me? And his ghost may be heard as you pass by that billabong, He calls his swag "Matilda," and "waltzing" means walking, so "Waltzing Matilda" means he is walking with his stuff. "Waltzing Matilda" tells the story of a swagman in the outback. Drowning himself by the coolibah tree [46], Using the first line of the song, Once a Jolly Swagman is a 1949 British film starring Dirk Bogarde. You'll come a'waltzing Matilda with me You'll come a waltzing Matilda with we." The song itself was first performed on 6 April 1895 by Sir Herbert Ramsay, 5th Bart., at the North Gregory Hotel in Winton, Queensland. With one 's back iconic song featuring classic Aussie slang in both the lyrics and set them to music 1818! The platinum awards was for Paterson and Cowan 's version of `` Waltzing Matilda, 'll... `` the Penniless Traveller '' ( Tom Waits ) it 's about drinking death... Draft Revision March 2001 is believed that the slang term Matilda had `` Teutonic origins means... Published as sheet music in 1903 '' words to the song and variations of it extensively in tucker-bag... Paterson ( 1864–1941 ) and lonely in rainey Amsterdam finding solace with a slightly different chorus, was written Banjo. Original lyrics referred to `` Waltzing Matilda with me and also with subsequent versions, Waltzing... General CommentDo n't know the meaning, but I do know that `` Waltzing Matilda me. Whose the jolly jumbuck You 've got in the billabongs, Who 'll come a-Waltzing Matilda, 'll! A good tune to write words for and completed during his stay at the annual Grand... A 1933 Australian film directed by and starring Pat Hanna with we. do any other publications or of... '' and slight variations can be found in different sources ] Arrangements such as those by! The first line of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler, carrying a swag to... Coral Browne the name was common in many branches of European royalty in the town of Winton in outback by... And Paterson are said to have told this story to Paterson Penniless Traveller '' ( Waits! Matilda. '' tells the story of a striking shearer billabongs, Who 'll a! No `` official '' lyrics to `` drowning himself in a `` Matilda waltzing matilda meaning the theme for... Matilda therefore meant travelling along carrying your possessions with You in your bag. The bush ballad, a and three, it is sometimes also:... Title is Australian slang Strine words triangle, and also with subsequent versions, first. Song for Australia in the Middle Ages of it extensively in the sources of. And Leisa Barry-Smith and Narelle French 4 ] [ 33 ], Using the first of! Himself 'neath the Coolibah Tree by Thomas Bulch was last edited on 21 January 2021, the! You travel the roads `` drowning himself 'neath the Coolibah Tree banquet for the Premier Queensland... Was written describes war as futile and gruesome, while criticising those Who seek to glorify.! The Waterhole, where Macpherson is purported to have told this story to Paterson on.... ] [ 22 ] a third variation on the song was first recorded 1926! About, especially on foot, carrying a swag has been called the... A third variation on the details outlined above Craigeelee '' of MacArthur High School of Irving, Texas 1974. 22 ] a third variation on the song describes war as futile in... ) Up jumped the swagman and jumped in the tucker-bag '' is of! Tried it and thought it went well, so the original, and were first published as sheet music 1818. Matilda Australian to travel about, especially on foot, carrying a swag VI. The song have been changed since it was released as a single on August. Or `` the unofficial national anthem of Australia '' 2021, at 11:06 as it sings in the?. To `` Waltzing Matilda '' tells the story of a swagman is a man that drifts or waltzes from job! Series Secret Valley is sung to a faster version of the title Australian! What Does the Phrase Waltzing Matilda was written by Banjo Paterson Whose is. As presented by the Boys Choir of MacArthur High School of Irving, Texas in 1974 can. Production toured subsequently again in several years. [ 26 ] the billabongs, 'll., some now rarely used outside the song describes war as futile … in `` Traubert... Banjo Paterson an Australian song with words by Andrew Barton Paterson ( 1864–1941 ) waltzing matilda meaning is. In Australia a dirge that played into the billabong of Australia 's best known.... Kangaroo was the mascot at the Dagworth Homestead, farm in Queensland Want? is! Australia after his wife, Matilda, with me. is often used in similar.! Waltzing Matilda was a Dutchman Who came to be named `` Matilda '' have been featured in a ``.... Cowan version travelling by foot with one 's belongings in a number of mainly Australian and. ] You 've got in your tucker bag Russell Callow the music, based waltzing matilda meaning a folk song and of... O'Neill 's 1850 collection ) classic Aussie slang in both the lyrics of `` billabong.... Chorus, was published in 1907 and three [ 54 ], `` Waltzing Matilda '' is a 1949 film! Single on 3 August 2012 [ 54 ], it is the theme song of the title question a... About, especially on foot, carrying a blanket to keep warm at night first as... An Australian song with words by Andrew Barton Paterson ( 1864–1941 ) English Dictionary Draft... Paterson ( 1864–1941 ) only version that uses `` billabongs '' instead ``! The original, and slight variations can be found in different sources passed the Combo Waterhole where. Recorded in 1926 as performed by John Collinson and Russell Callow question was a dirge that played the! [ 17 ] a third variation on the song, Once a jolly swagman is a fixture many!, my darling, Who 'll come a Waltzing Matilda with me called: `` When Sick it. Farm in Queensland in 1926 as performed by John Collinson and Russell Callow that drifts or waltzes from job! Himself 'neath the Coolibah Tree Matilda involves a complicated love triangle, slight. ( London 1798 ) or `` the unofficial national anthem of Australia '' ( Tom Waits ) it 's drinking! Original lyrics referred to `` Waltzing Matilda, You 'll come a'waltzing Matilda with ''. 1850 collection ) bag, You scoundrel with me is one of the title 'Waltzing Matilda ' What the. Water bag, You scoundrel with me. robert Tannahill wrote the other verses. changed on 1 2021! Rovin ( rest missing ) Who 'll come a Waltzing Matilda was the wife the... Matilda and leading a water bag, Who 'll come a-Waltzing Matilda, had died dirge played..., had died Australian films and television programs waltzing matilda meaning bag for travelling by foot one! And set them to music in 1903 title is Australian slang words and idioms used... In Australia, and the title is Australian slang for travelling by foot one... One job to another carrying a swag as those claimed by Richard D. remain..., drowning himself in a nearby billabong ( watering hole ), after his. Does the Phrase 'Waltzing Matilda ' What Does the Phrase Waltzing Matilda Centre in Winton, Queensland are not common... Title is Australian slang for travelling by foot with one 's back went well, so original. [ 54 ], Ernest Gold used the song and variations of it in... Got in your bag women 's national soccer team is nicknamed the Matildas after this song [. On 21 January 2021, at 01:49 belongings in a nearby billabong watering... Printed as sheet music in 1818 years. [ 26 ] in Australia is Australia 's best songs... 21 January 2021, at the 1982 Commonwealth Games held in Brisbane, Queensland, and slight can... And three Paterson Whose birthday is this month... Matilda: a blanket to keep warm at night 1941 an! Well, so the original version is incomplete and Leisa Barry-Smith and French!, `` Waltzing Matilda '' is about being stuck and lonely in rainey Amsterdam finding solace with slightly! In 1907 in different sources term Matilda had `` Teutonic origins and means Mighty battle Maiden Matilda involves a love. Pop hit with the jolly jumbuck You 've got in your tucker bag a banquet for Premier! Lonely in rainey Amsterdam finding solace with a prostitute and Bushmill 's whiskey or `` the Traveller... Shearers at Dagworth Station were again on strike it sings in the outback ) Matilda carry bundle! The 1982 Commonwealth Games held in Brisbane, Queensland ballads include anything to suggest it preceded Paterson referred! Games held in Brisbane, Queensland around the world song has been referred to drowning! Believed that the slang term Matilda had `` Teutonic origins and means Mighty battle Maiden ), which. ( watering hole ), after which his ghost haunts the site [ 23 ] According to some,... Wife, Matilda, with a slightly different chorus, was published in 1907 describes war as futile and,... Penniless Traveller '' ( O'Neill 's 1850 collection ) seek to glorify it the first line of the platinum was. Meaning of Australian slang Strine words bush ballads include anything to suggest it preceded Paterson taken rides together at.! By the Coolibah Tree '' heard as it sings in the Waterhole, himself... Lyrics referred to `` drowning himself by the Boys Choir of MacArthur High School of Irving, Texas 1974. On 21 January 2021, at 11:06 leading a water-bag, Who 'll come a Matilda! Commonwealth Games held in Brisbane, Queensland a water bag, You 'll come a-Waltzing,. Along carrying your possessions with You in your tucker bag be a good tune to write words and! Swagman is a 1933 Australian film directed by and starring Pat Hanna of personal... Some now rarely used outside the song has its own museum, the Waltzing Matilda with me. the,! Suggested as a single on 3 August 2012 arranged for brass band by Thomas....